Creativity

Rejection’s only Temporary

I found this post in my archives and thought I’d bring it up again. Before you take your latest rejection to heart, take a look at these Rejection Notices from now famous books:

Animal Farm – George Orwell
It’s impossible to sell animal stories in the USA.

The Diary of Anne Frank
The girl doesn’t, it seems to me, have a special perception or feeling which would lift that book above the mere “curiosity” level.

Plenty of great projects were rejected first – some were rejected many times.  Remember that a major record label rejected The Beatles because they thought guitar music was just a passing fad.

The problem is, too many people with great ideas stop working once they get rejected.  Learn from rejection, just like you can learn from all criticism, but never let rejection overpower your determination.

If it’s a truly original idea, few people will see it’s potential.  So don’t give up.

Have you had any projects rejected, only to become a success later?

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8 Comments

  1. I could not agree more.

    I have written a number of novels and in that time had countless rejection letters, two literary agents and two near misses for publication (unforeseen financial problems for the publisher and concern that I was an unknown name were the reasons respectively), but I am determined to keep at it until I succeed.

    Watch this space!

  2. I know all about rejection even without the writing end of things

    I grew up with Aspergers Syndrome (ASD) and ADD

    and I got plenty of rejections and snubs

    from people all of my life

    it got so bad that I developed a severe curvature in my spine

    the x-rays showed it looking like a question mark

    from the hanging my head down from low self esteem

    caused by the rejection

    Today I am an aspiring screenwriter

    with many works in progress

    and I still have to deal with a lot of misunderstandings from people

    because of my disability

    and had to graduate from high school

    and go straight into retirement because people with Aspergers

    have to focus on their talents

    Some people such as Dr.Temple Grandin a well known Aspergers author

    received her doctorate degree in animal husbandry

    and is an ardent animal rights activist

    If any of you have seen the HBO film Temple Grandin

    you know who I am talking about

    Some say that Bill Gates has Aspergers

    since he was obsessed with writing software programs while in his school years

    and then there is Albert Einstein another famous one

    There are many out there that have to focus on their talents

    and the ordinary job does not work for those with ASD

    I myself have to focus on the arts such as acting,music,screenwriting,voice overs etc…

    and it is so hard to find an agent especially now days with so many agency scams out

    there making it harder than ever get into that field of work.

    There is a lot of talent out there and people like myself have locked out of it for years

    and since just working at McDonalds or something is not for me it makes all the harder

    so I am stuck living of of the S.S.I. until I hit the jackpot and the doors of opportunity

    are flung wide open for me.

    God Bless

    Peter G.Albers

  3. To Peter:Your comment was heartfelt and honest and I was so thankful that I read it. More people with ASD need to be recognized and understood. I have a son diagnosed with ASD and he is brilliant however, he struggles in ways that most others do not. His talents and abilites have a place but don’t fit in the natural scheme of things either. Colleges and universities are just beginning to make provisions for educating the brilliant minds of ASD students but it’s certainly at the infancy stage.
    I appreciate that Phil has created a forum for people to comment and furthermore, appreciate your bravery in writing so candidly. I pray that you’ll find a place where your gifts are celebrated and your contribution can be as well. Temple Grandin profoundly states, “That we are different not less.” Some of the greatest artists, scientists, authors,physicists,researchers(and the list could go on for miles) are those who fit the ASD criteria long before it made it into the DVS-M. Their contributions were well-noted but beyond that, they were people and we are to love people more for who they are than what they can accomplish.
    Thank you for bringing an honest,humble account of what life is like for those with ASD and how we,as a society, sadly dismiss them far too often. Your words are a reality check for all of us in the work of the Gospel;when it’s all said and done, we’ll be judged for how we treated God’s own.
    Peter, you’re in my prayers.

  4. This article… and the following comments are really good encouragement!

    I heard that the typical path to success for any original idea is first it is rejected, than ridiculed, than it is accepted, and finally it is imitated.

    If your idea is truly original you may have to suffer the haters for a whole before you experience acceptance and imitation.

  5. I think an important question to ask when pursuing a project is, “If no one else sees this, is it worth my time?” So many artists through history weren’t recognized when they were alive. It’s only worth the time and labor if it’s something that has deep value to you.

  6. Thankful for all rejection for that, made me strong and Thanks for acceptances that we are glad about ( even few that are regretful , LOL ). We all have gone through that ‘Apply-Apply, No Reply’ phase. Every time we have made ourselves more determined and tried pushing harder the next time.

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