Creative LeadershipCreativityMedia Production

The Power of “Doing”

When are you ready to start?

I spend a lot of time with fellow filmmakers, who always remind me of the power of “doing.”  Too many of us waste our lives waiting for the right moment before we step out and take a risk.  But the people who really accomplish something special are those who are willing to be embarrased.  Whatever your dream may be, my word for you today is: Start.  Begin networking.  Write a script.  Make a digital short. Draw your idea on the back of a napkin.  Get your courage up and call that potential investor.

Don’t wait for the “perfect” moment.  Become known as a “doer” – a “make it happen” person.  When you start “doing,” you’ll become a magnet for people and projects.  Nike’s right:  “Just Do It.”

Tags

Related Articles

5 Comments

  1. As my college acting instructor used to tell us: “Shut up and DO it”. I think he may have taught a Nike ad exec at some point in the past. 🙂

  2. In the parable of the talents, the story emphasizes doing over not doing. Two men double their talents. On man buries his. Utterly fascinating is the absence of one who tried something with his talent, but lost part or all of it! Apparently, that outcome was not worth mentioning, because the emphasis is so strong on the tragedy of doing nothing. Perhaps God forgives failure more easily than we do. In martial arts they have a saying about victory: If you are knocked down seven times, get up eight.

  3. I am a comedy writer/director/Chritian Gospel Comic, who has worked many years with my two mentors Bill Cosby and Norman Lear. I have written for Bill Cosby Show, “Good Times” “The Jeffersons” Diff’rent Strokes” Malcolm & Eddie’ “City Guy” and several other TV sitcoms as a writer/Story Editor. I’ve also won a NAACP Image award, etc. Since 2005, I have written ten screenplays and five TV comedy pilots. Instead of a comment, I would like to thank you for opening my eyes to the same game, but new rules on the playing field. I don’t know why I didn’t see it earlier. I guess I was too caught up in the old school way of selling a script or TV show. The Norman Lear and Garry Marshalls of TV are gone. Today, we have wondeful super bright young educated youngters running the ball at the networks/studios and it appears that very few have creative, innovative comedy, organic minds, because they haven’t been taught the three stages of comedy. Over current – middle current and under current. Over the top comedy only works when you have a solid base of real comedy to balance it. I learned that from Cosby and Lear. Believe it or not “I love Lucy” is still funny. Over the top, yes!!! But look how well the other characters around her were funny, but more grounded, giving Lucy the MILEAGE she needed to be outrage–at the same time keeping that under current of balance flowing. Bob Newhart, Jerry Seinfeld and Bill Cosby and a few more shows were the last of the what I call funny comedies with a back bone. Man, I getting fired up, just thinking about it. I’ve got to go and write another TV sitcom tonight. Thanks again, Mr. Phil Cooke. God bless!! “If God is for you — who can be against you” Looking forward to meeting you in the future.

  4. Once again you hit the nail on the head. I used to be a person who couldn’t act until all of the conditions seemed right. That enabled me to miss many opportunities. However, over the last 5-10 years, my mindset has been changing to one of a “doer”.

    Case and point is my new book, Speedsuit Powers. We’re gearing up to record the audio book. I converted the book manuscript into an audio script format and have started to reach out to voice actors… even though I don’t have a recording space secured… yet.

    If I waited around for all of the pieces to come together, I’d still be waiting. But the pieces have been coming together as I move forward, while praying for God’s guidance.

    If I can be honest about why I was not a doer in the past – much of it had to do with being afraid of failure. It always seemed “safer” not to try than to try and fail. However, my conclusion is that “it is often better to act than to refrain from acting and wish you would have.”

    Much of what we can achieve in life is directly related to the actions we take… or don’t take.

    Allen Paul Weaver III
    Author, Speedsuit Powers
    http://www.APW3.com / http://www.speedsuitpowers.com

Leave a Reply

Back to top button
Close

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker