Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Digital EyeScream

    Ah! The visual Freudian slip! It’s harder to come up with an original, meaningful logo than people think. Many people underestimate the power of good graphic design and think their nephew can do it for a buck fifty. How do you visually express in one succinct mnemonic symbol all that your company is? How do you create instant public recognition in a sea of similarity? The pricetag on a company’s branding includes the expertise required to create the face of your company, the personality, representation, first impression and communication that you greet every new customer with for decades to come. You want to make sure that it has been well thought through and you’re not communicating something you don’t intend.

    • Love the line: “The pricetag on a company’s branding includes the expertise required to create the face of your company, the personality, and representation.” Thanks for sharing that!

  • Ehren Addis

    Good stuff. A couple things come to mind. 1) Uber hired a few professionals to redesign their logo, but their failure to listen lead to an even bigger blunder. This goes to say, if it aint broke, don’t fix it. 2) Airbnb on the other hand went straight to the stock logos and took item number 36 from page 18 of ‘Trademarks & Symbols of the World: The Alphabet in Design’ by Yasaburo Kuwayama (1988). I’m not sure if that was merely coincidence. 3) Colors cost money to print and sometimes it’s not an option. So make sure your logo is adaptable to black and white. 4) I still wear knee high socks and have a mullet, so I’ll stop with the trendy stuff. I guess logos are like personal names. Some have great ones, and then there are those unfortunate soles who had to suffer through grade school. In the end, it doesn’t define you, but it sure is the first impression.

    • Brilliant Ehren. Absolutely true. Thanks for posting!

  • Jim Barnwell

    I would add “keep it simple.” We baptists really know how to make simple complex, i.e. convoluted. I saw a church logo once that had SEVEN sub-icons. It even had a sheet explaining what it all meant. It was jumbled, busy, confusing, and just didn’t communicate anything because it tried to communicate everything. It was likely designed by committee, not branding professionals.

  • Tony Figueroa