Breaking News: Young People Prefer Streaming Television

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Recently, Variety Magazine reported that for audiences 8-18, streaming TV is the favorite entertainment delivery option.  Even more than video games, young people today are watching streaming video. However (and this is a big however) watching LIVE TV is still what they spend the most time doing. Here’s the breakdown of viewing habits:

Should Churches Produce TV Programs?


It’s pretty popular these days to bash local churches producing broadcast TV programs. Even megachurches with adequate budgets for media don’t escape the criticism. After all, the history of Christian television shows us that a significant number of programs through the years were downright embarrassing, and if anything, drove people away from the faith, rather than toward it. But in spite of the mistakes, poor quality, and questionable results of some church efforts, here’s 5 reasons I still encourage churches to consider a broadcast ministry:

Would Major TV Networks Be Interested In My Faith Based Show Idea?


With the success of “The Bible” TV series, and “Finding Jesus” on CNN, I’ve been getting plenty of inquires from people who want to get other Christian ideas picked up by a secular network. In many cases, they’re starting from the wrong perspective. The first step isn’t getting your show idea on a network. The first step is finding out what the network is interested in programming. With that in mind, here’s a few critical principles about how to get a secular network to look at your Christian program idea:

When To Give Up On Your Ideas or Projects


Yesterday I wrote about resilience, and how important it can be to not give up on your ideas, your projects, and your dreams – even in the face of opposition. I used my friend Producer Ken Wales as an example of someone who pitched a movie idea for years and years and eventually made it happen. But the truth is, there are situations when it’s actually better to let go of an idea and move on – even if you’ve spent years developing and writing it. The problem is –

How People Watch TV in a Multiscreen Era


Recently, Variety Magazine highlighted a study by Strategy Analytics that attempted to understand how people view television in the multiscreen era. I’ve written before that television is alive and well, and shouldn’t be written off in the age of the Internet. But there’s no question, the way people view programming is changing. Overall, when it comes to viewing habits these days, here’s the breakdown:

Who’s Creating The Movies and TV Programs That Will Inspire The Next Generation?


This past week I had two interesting experiences. First – it was the 100 year anniversary of the birth of Clayton Moore – who played “The Lone Ranger” on television. The series originally aired on ABC from 1949-1957, and was the highest-rated television program on the network in the early 1950s and its first true “hit”. As a kid, I watched it as re-runs, and it was one of my favorite shows. As you may remember, The Lone Ranger lived by a code, and as a kid, I knew the code by heart. Last week, during the news reports of the anniversary, his daughter, Dawn Moore said something remarkable:

New Research Confirms Broadcast TV Still Matters


New research in June by GfK Media indicates the number of Americans now relying on over-the-air broadcast television reception has actually increased to almost 54 million, up from 46 million just a year ago. This is a pretty significant piece of data. In one year, the number of homes getting their TV signals solely over-the-air without cable or satellite has gone up almost 20%. Not a big surprise, the survey found