New Media’s New Passion for Old Television


Just when most critics of TV were convinced online platforms had nailed the TV coffin shut, a resurrection of sorts is happening. And of all places, that TV resurrection is happening because of the online platforms we thought would would kill it. This year alone, online companies like Vice Media, BuzzFeed, Huffington Post and others are moving into new territory:

Breaking News: Young People Prefer Streaming Television

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Recently, Variety Magazine reported that for audiences 8-18, streaming TV is the favorite entertainment delivery option.  Even more than video games, young people today are watching streaming video. However (and this is a big however) watching LIVE TV is still what they spend the most time doing. Here’s the breakdown of viewing habits:

How People Watch TV in a Multiscreen Era


Recently, Variety Magazine highlighted a study by Strategy Analytics that attempted to understand how people view television in the multiscreen era. I’ve written before that television is alive and well, and shouldn’t be written off in the age of the Internet. But there’s no question, the way people view programming is changing. Overall, when it comes to viewing habits these days, here’s the breakdown:

New Research Confirms Broadcast TV Still Matters


New research in June by GfK Media indicates the number of Americans now relying on over-the-air broadcast television reception has actually increased to almost 54 million, up from 46 million just a year ago. This is a pretty significant piece of data. In one year, the number of homes getting their TV signals solely over-the-air without cable or satellite has gone up almost 20%. Not a big surprise, the survey found

Multi-Camera Video Directors in Church – Why It Shouldn’t Be a Volunteer


There are many churches today that are shooting their worship services, concerts, and other events with multiple cameras. Whether you have a broadcast media ministry or not, it’s not unusual to use multiple cameras and switch them live for the IMAG screens, DVD sales, or eventual TV broadcasts. But in more and more churches and ministries, I’m seeing a disturbing trend that devalues the multi-camera director. Sometimes it’s the