Bad Email Habits That Kill Your Productivity and Waste Hours Every Day

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It’s time to get serious about your email habits.  Millions of people waste millions of hours because they won’t discipline themselves about how they process the tons of email they receive every day. Studies show we spend almost 1/3 of our day dealing with email, so here’s a list of your biggest email productivity killers – the habits that literally waste hours of your day. Fix these problems and you’ll discover free time you never even knew you had:

How To Get Noticed On The Job

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I heard an employee described recently as a person who “simply passes everything on.” They meant he was someone who never takes responsibility, never deals with the issue, and never fixes the problem. They simply pass it on to someone else. How many people do you know who do exactly that?  Today’s lesson:

Surprise! Here’s Your Biggest Distraction At The Office

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There’s been plenty written about distractions these days – especially at the office. Everyday workers face a variety of obstacles to focused work that didn’t exist with past generations of employees. Social media, the Internet, mobile phones, text messages and more whittle away the kind of blocked out time that it takes to do great work. But as far back as 2011 a study in the journal “Organization Studies” revealed the single greatest interruption we face at work:

Why You Should Stop Complaining About Being Busy

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I met three different people today, and each time, when I asked, “How are you?” The reply was exactly the same. “I’m Busy”. Honestly, I hear the same answer from the vast majority of people I meet. So I started to think: “Guess what? Everybody’s busy!” I’m busy, you’re busy, everybody’s busy. So you know what? You being busy doesn’t make me sympathetic at all. Because

The Greatest Secret for Breakthrough Creativity

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While I believe that everyone is creative, the truth is, real breakthrough creativity is rare – because it takes work, skill, and courage. But many pursue it, and as a result, there are thousands of websites, social media feeds, books and other resources on creativity. But from my perspective, the greatest secret for breakthrough creativity can be taken from a quote from novelist Kingsley Amis:

Be Honest: Are You Addicted to Being Online?

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The American Psychiatric Association is focusing more and more attention to our online behavior – some might say “addiction.”  For instance, they’ve officially recommended “Internet-use Gaming Disorder” for further study.  I’m a contributor to Fast Company magazine, and they recently did a reader poll and discovered that 47.5% of their readers admitted to feeling addicted to the Internet. Perhaps a more revealing look at people’s behavior is the question of what people are willing to give up to spend more time online:

4 Secrets to Help You Manage Multiple Creative Projects

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Writer’s block, boredom, hitting a wall – all are terms creative people use when they run out of ideas. One of the best ways to overcome those moments of terror is to work on multiple projects at once. In fact, multiple projects may be the best remedy for creative block. Plus, I’ve discovered that if you actually want to make a living with your creative profession, managing multiple projects becomes a necessity. But if you struggle with simultaneous creative efforts, here’s 4 keys that should help:

Two Critical Traits You Need to Focus on in 2015

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In the book “Extreme: Why Some People Thrive at the Limits,” writers Emma Barrett and Paul Martin explore what makes thrill seekers get such a rush from being out on the edge. “Brain imaging studies,” they write “have found that risk seeking behavior is preceded by activity in the region of the brain associated with the anticipation of pleasurable experiences like sex, drug taking, and monetary gain.” In other words,