People Don’t Get Online Church – And Here’s How to Fix It

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I received an interesting note from Joe Hayes, head of the TV and video ministry at Redemption World Outreach Center in Greenville, South Carolina. At Redemption, the Sunday online worship service is succeeding way beyond expectations. Since so many churches have an online video feed of their live service on Sunday – and yet very few do it well – here’s 4 tips from Joe that might help:

Terrorism, the Media, and the Online Battle for Hearts and Minds

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Whenever I hear about church and ministry leaders who refuse to engage today’s culture through digital, online platforms, I’m reminded of speaking at a media conference last year in Madrid. It was a gathering of “media missionaries” who are using the media in innovative ways to share the Christian faith throughout Europe and the Middle East. One of the producers quoted Gilles Kepel, a French academic and expert on Islam from an interview with Arab World Media as far back as 2004:

It’s Time to Break Your Email Addiction

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We all have it to some degree, and now, psychologists are actually trying to quantify it and make a broadly addressed behavioral problem. I’m not sure I’d agree with that, but I do think it’s more serious that most people realize, especially when it keeps you from accomplishing significant things with your life. To that end, here’s some principles to think about the next time you sit down at the computer or check your mobile device:

Are Negative Comments Online Damaging Creativity?

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Blogs have comment sections. Facebook has comments. People can respond to anything you say on Twitter. Social media is not just about being “social,” it’s about getting a response. The problem is, many of us debut creative ideas online. We try out the subject of a new book, or present a concept for an ad campaign or movie idea. In similar cases, leaders toss out new ideas to see what people think. But sometimes,

If You Love Jesus, “Like” This Post

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The title of this post is one of the dumbest, most worthless phrases I see in social media today. It’s a cheap, easy way to jack up your “likes” without offering any real substance whatsoever. I’m ranting, because I see it used way too often on the social media pages of churches, nonprofits, and ministries. First – it’s puts the viewer in an awkward position: “What? Of course I love Jesus, so I must “like” it.”  But are you really engaging the viewer? Are they viewing your content, watching your videos, or participating in your online project?  Second -

Tweeting Tips for Nonprofit and Church Leaders

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Scanning the Twitter feeds of nonprofit and religious leaders, it’s pretty easy to see that most have little or no knowledge of how to connect online. From boring Tweets like “I’m at Starbucks having a latte,” to subtly patting yourself on the back (“Praise God, we had 6,000 cars in the lot this Sunday!”)  you’re driving people away when you should be sharing your story and connecting it with others. So here’s a few tips to get your social media life back on track:

Is Email Taking Over Your Life?

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During a film shoot in Tucson, Arizona for a new Internet project, I woke up at 4am unable to sleep.  So as millions do when our sleep is interrupted, I got up and started wading through my cluttered email inbox.  Email consumes enormous amounts of time (some studies indicate that 40% of a typical employee’s day is spent sending and receiving email).  Yet we rarely think about strategies to use it more effectively.  In addition, research shows that a significant amount of email is misinterpreted, leading to embarrassment and sometimes being fired.  A few simple guidelines can keep you from wasting enormous time, and protect you from humiliation, frustration, and even legal issues.  So try out these ideas and see if you can begin to gain some ground in the daily email war:

Do You Have a Social Media “Friend” Who Annoys You? Dump Them.

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When Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Goodreads, or other social media platforms became available, most of us jumped on them with great excitement. We “friended” everyone we could find. But now, months or years later, we all have “friends” that annoy the heck out of us. Maybe they’re obsessive about one thing, or they just have weird rants, or feel their one purpose in life is to criticize whatever you post. Here’s the answer:

Leaders – Don’t Forget that “Social Media” is SOCIAL

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It may seem obvious, but I’ve found that too many leaders and their organizations think that by posting on blogs, Twitter, Facebook, or other sites on a regular basis, they’re engaging in social media. But afterwards, if you’re not responding back to what your followers are saying, you couldn’t be more mistaken. Let me give you a great example of how one company gets it right: