It’s Time to Stop Worrying About Everyone’s Loyalty

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There was a time when loyalty was everything. My father’s generation worked at the same company for an entire career, professional athletes stayed long term with a single team, and Ford people would never dream of owning a Chevy. In those days, loyalty to a job was assumed. I’ve actually seen employees fired – not because they were incompetent – but because the boss didn’t

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The Power of Small Creative Teams

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When it comes to brainstorming and creative teams, Jeff Bezos at Amazon.com says to keep them small. Usually, when I’m involved in creative meetings with clients, most organizations want 20-30 people in meetings and that’s just too large and unproductive a group to work. With a smaller group of key people, you don’t waste a lot of time and man hours on bad ideas. Plus, like a herd of cats, large creative teams are simply too unwieldy to manage well.  Small groups move faster and are more nimble.  The perfect number?  

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Leadership Guest Post: Who’s Holding Your Ladder?

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Today I’ve asked leadership expert Sam Chand to give us one of the most important principles he’s ever learned about leadership.  Sam’s one of the most respected consultants and coaches in the world, and I’m always interested in any insights he has about leadership.  Here’s Sam’s answer to my question:

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Be Cautious When Hiring Your Family

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Although nearly every church, ministry, or non-profit client I’ve ever known hires their family, I always urge caution when doing it.  Sure – there’s nothing we’d all like better than to hire our spouse, children, or other relatives.  The idea of a “family company” sounds great.  But in truth, it doesn’t work as well as you think.  Entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki is direct and too the point, but worth listening to when he says: 

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The 5 People I’ll Never Hire Again

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Working with our team at Cooke Pictures, I’ve produced hundreds of film and video projects over the years, and in the process hired thousands of people. I’ve worked on every continent, and about 50 countries. After all that experience hiring and sometimes firing, these are the five types of people – on a film set or in the office – I will never hire again:

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Are You A Good Listener? Learn The Keys to “Selective Listening:”

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Are you a good listener?  You’re not learning if you’re doing all the talking, and far too many people think they need to talk to get noticed.  So I asked the founder and CEO of Infinity Concepts, Mark Dreistadt, the secrets of listening well.  Have you ever been accused of “selective hearing?”  You know – the process that happens when you intentionally don’t want to hear something.  Well, there are actually five different ways we listen.  So here’s the 5 secrets to what Mark calls “Selective Listening” – how many have you experienced?

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This is the Age of Nimble

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Bureaucracy is dead. This is the age of “nimble.” Trust me on this – if your organization has silos, turf battles, or is overwhelmed by policy manuals, you’re about to get squashed by smaller, nimbler, and hungrier organizations. You see bureaucracy everywhere today – the government can’t even pass a budget because of the number of special interests they have to please. Hostess, the maker of Twinkies is out of business because among other things, their Union rules required cake and bread to travel in separate trucks, and barred drivers from loading and unloading. Nimbler firms were

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Making Leadership Transitions Work

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While writing my book “Unique:  Telling Your Story in the Age of Brands and Social Media,” I discovered that far too many businesses and nonprofits struggle with leadership transitions, especially moving from founders to what I call “second generation” leadership.  Whatever transition you’re in (or see coming up), this short video is worth watching.  The stakes are too high to fail:

 

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