Pastors: Read This Before You Respond To Media Requests on The Same-Sex Marriage Ruling

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There’s no question that local pastors will be interviewed about their position and response to the recent Supreme Court ruling on same sex marriage. But before you answer that call, here’s a few things to remember:  Whatever denomination you’re from, just for context, you should read the statement from current and past presidents of the Southern Baptist Convention released just two weeks ago on the issue. Since they’re the largest Protestant group in America, you should know their position, because it may come up in an interview.  Regarding the ruling, here’s some thoughts that may help as you formulate a response – particularly to secular media requests on the issue: 

Leaders: Be Careful Using Statistics in Your Presentations or Social Media

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Today’s post is a guest piece from media researcher Ron Sellers, from Grey Matter Research.  In his presentation “Insert Brian Williams Joke Here” he brings up a very important point for leaders to try to make an impact using “the latest research.”  Before you do something embarrassing, this is worth a read:

Do You Talk Too Much? Here’s How to Tell.

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Most people talk too much. That’s a given. People love the sound of their own voice, and truthfully it happens for a number of reasons. As Mark Goulston says in the Harvard Business Review:  “First, is the very simple reason that all human beings have a hunger to be listened to. But second, because the process of talking about ourselves releases dopamine, the pleasure hormone. One of the reasons gabby people keep gabbing is because they become addicted to that pleasure.”  But overly chatty people drive everyone else crazy. So how can you tell you’re talking too much?

What To Do The First 24 Hours After a Leader’s Moral Failure

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In the religious and nonprofit world, a leader’s moral failure still has a major impact. Along with the theological and scriptural issues, there’s also a significant trust issue involved. The common thinking is that if he or she can’t be trusted to honor marriage vows, then the leader is likely untrustworthy in other areas as well. However you personally fall on the spectrum of that thinking, the truth is, churches, ministries, and nonprofits take a heavy hit when a leader has an affair, or worse, is involved in illegal sexual behavior. In these cases, how the organization reacts in the first 24 hours is critical. Having advised numerous organizations through these difficult situations, here’s my recommendations for the first 24 hours of the crisis:

Want To Be More Interesting? Start By Asking Better Questions

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Today’s post is a guest column from branding expert Krysta Masciale of Big Deal Branding. She’s brilliant at networking, and has pinpointed one of the biggest challenges people experience engaging other people. Ever felt awkward meeting an important professional in your business? Or struggled engaging people at conferences, parties, or other events? Chances are, you’re not asking the right questions. So here’s Krysta’s key questions you should think about the next time you cross paths with a thought leader:

How To Deal With Online Church Trolls

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I’ve consulted with hundreds of churches over the years, and sadly, there’s one common enemy some of the most effective churches in America share – online trolls.  In these cases, at least one disgruntled ex-church member has decided to launch a Facebook page, Twitter feed, and in some cases a blog with the express purpose of criticizing the church. There are many reasons: some were offended by the pastor, others don’t like the church’s teaching, a few feel they were taken advantage of, and still others are convinced they’ve uncovered secret

5 Things I Learned from the Bomb Squad Conference

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Last week I had the incredible opportunity to speak into the lives of forty top Salvation Army leaders from their Eastern Territory. We talked about engaging culture in today’s digital age, developing great teams, and becoming more effective influencers. It was a terrific time. But during our sessions, we were next door to a law enforcement conference focused on men and women from bomb squads across the country. During the breaks, I had the chance to talk to a few, and learned some ideas that all of us could use in our own leadership:

The Secrets of Confronting Without Offending

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At some point, all leaders will be required to confront someone on their team. It may be about performance, personal behavior, mismanagement, or a host of other possibilities, but confrontation is critical – and inevitable – in all organizations. However, as Deborah Smith Pegues points out in her excellent book “Confronting Without Offending,” the key is to use confrontation to make better employees, not drive them away. Here’s a few of her tips for making that happen:

Surprise! Here’s Your Biggest Distraction At The Office

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There’s been plenty written about distractions these days – especially at the office. Everyday workers face a variety of obstacles to focused work that didn’t exist with past generations of employees. Social media, the Internet, mobile phones, text messages and more whittle away the kind of blocked out time that it takes to do great work. But as far back as 2011 a study in the journal “Organization Studies” revealed the single greatest interruption we face at work: