Globalizing Your Media Means Localizing Your Media

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Whenever I travel internationally, I’m always surprised to find that when watching American produced religious programming, the vast majority of programs do nothing related to local audiences.  In other words, the program open and close, structure, and even commercial spots were the exact same as the program that had been broadcast in Cleveland, Atlanta, or Tulsa.  It goes without saying that creating a commercial spot with an American phone number and a price in dollars is going to fail when its broadcast in Russia, South Africa, or Bolivia.  And yet,


The Secrets to Producing Successful Media Projects Overseas


Shooting internationally can be an incredible experience. Over the years, our team at Cooke Pictures has produced programming in more than 60 countries around the world, and we’ve only experienced a handful of bad incidents. That’s not to say things haven’t been difficult – like when we did an interview with a Brazilian drug dealer while his gang held a gun on our cameraman, or when my crew was arrested at the airport in Lagos, Nigeria, or when we got caught up in a military coup. There’s been more, but you get the picture. During it all, we’ve learned a few things about how to keep those incidents to a minimum, so the next time you produce an overseas project, maybe this list will help:


What I Learned from African Media Professionals

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Recently, Kathleen and I had the opportunity to be the keynote speakers at the annual conference for the Association of Christian Media in Johannesburg, South Africa. We had about 150 leaders in attendance, and some had to be turned away. The attendees represented a wide range of communicators across Africa, from radio, TV, print, Internet, social media, and more. The attendance was the largest in the organization’s history, and as usual, the incredible experience taught me a few things about using the media to share our faith with the world: