The 10 Most Common Communication Problems

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You may not know that before he was President of Fox News and Chairman of Fox Television Stations Group, Roger Ailes ran a corporate communications firm. He advised presidents like Ronald Reagan, celebrities, and major corporate CEO’s. In his book “You Are The Message” he lists the 10 most common communication problems that apply to speakers, executives, and leaders of all kinds. Here’s the list, because it’s worth thinking about. Which of these do you have the most difficulty?

The Perils and Prize of Leadership: An Interview with Dr. Sam Chand

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One of the most respected voices on church and ministry leadership today is Dr. Sam Chand.  On his website his tag line is “My Life’s Vision is Helping Others Succeed” – and he’s good at it.  Sam and I have shared a number of clients over the years and time and time again, I’ve seen him turn around struggling churches, inspire frustrated leaders, and transform the culture at failing organizations.  Recently, I did an interview with Dr. Chand because I wanted to share some of his experience,  wisdom, and insight on church and ministry leadership.  Take notes.  Share it.  This is powerful stuff:

When Leaders Don’t Enjoy Spending Time With Their Team

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In my consulting work over the last 30 years, one of the most common complaints I get – particularly at churches and nonprofit organizations – is that leaders don’t spend much time with their team.  Understand it’s not just about being busy. In most situations it’s pastors, executives, COO’s and other leaders who simply don’t enjoy spending time with their team. In case that’s happening at your organization, and since I’ve heard it from both sides, when it happens, here’s my advice for both parties:

Making Leadership Transitions Work

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While writing my book “Unique:  Telling Your Story in the Age of Brands and Social Media,” I discovered that far too many businesses and nonprofits struggle with leadership transitions, especially moving from founders to what I call “second generation” leadership.  Whatever transition you’re in (or see coming up), this short video is worth watching.  The stakes are too high to fail:

 

Don’t Wait Until the Crisis Happens

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Sir Jonathan Miller is a highly regarded theatrical director based in London, and while I was watching him work on a BBC documentary the other night, he said something brilliant:  “You learn to ice skate in the summertime.”  He mentioned it was a lesson his father taught him.  It took awhile for it to sink in, and then I realized the power of what he was really saying. Once the game, project, production, business, crisis – whatever starts, it’s too late to learn what to do. Take the classes, learn the techniques, get the knowledge before the crisis begins, or

New Leaders: Accountability Starts On Day One

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In the last few years there have been some decisive shifts in leadership at major companies and nonprofit organizations. I spent the afternoon a few months ago with one who took over for a retired CEO at a well-known nonprofit organization. This new leader has been in place for over three years, but the truth is, he’s failing – badly. When I asked him about it, he blamed it on the previous retired CEO. The former leader wasn’t terribly decisive, and created a culture where everyone thought they should have a vote on everything. Needless to say, the administrative structure collapsed pretty quickly, and mutiny became

Leadership vs. Management: 13 Tactical Differences

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Today’s guest post is from Mark Dreistadt, founder of Infinity Concepts in Pittsburgh. Infinity is an advertising, marketing, and donor development firm that has created the “DNA Workshop” – helping organizations discover their unique identity. Mark’s post is a challenge for leaders to understand the differences between Leadership and Management:

Leaders: Are You Listening to Good Advice?

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A recent study to be published in the journal:   “Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes,” indicates that the more powerful the executive, the less likely he or she is to take advice from co-workers.  You may know it as the “executive bubble” where leaders get so insulated they cut themselves off from outside advice.  The study pinpoints the reason to the fact that the more powerful an individual, the more inflated their sense of importance.  In other words, the less they “think” they need other’s advice.  The most interesting aspect of the report found that

2008 Act One Executive and Writing Programs Now Open

Applications for the 2008 Act One Executive and Writing Programs are now available online. The success of the Act One programs depends on the quality of our students, and every year the most effective method of getting news about Act One to high-quality applicants is word of mouth. Please help us by thinking of smart, talented, culturally savvy Christians who are serious about their faith and who love movies and television, and then

Working with Consultants – The 10 Biggest Mistakes

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During this trip to Australia, I’ve been asked a lot about what Cooke Pictures does when it consults with major non-profit, church, and ministry clients. I realized that most people really don’t understand how outside consultants can make a difference in helping an organization get to the next level. But the truth is, in the secular arena, “outsourcing” is all the rage – especially in corporate America. The theory behind the practice is worth thinking about: If there is some aspect of your business that you don’t do well, then outsource it to someone who does. For instance, a corporation that builds computers, might not be so strong at strategic planning, or a company that manufactures sports equipment, probably doesn’t understand marketing and public relations. So they find consultants with experience and success in those areas to give them advice, training, and expertise. Could churches, ministries, and other religious and non-profit organizations benefit from the concept?