What Hollywood Knows About Resilience That You Don’t

Wales,Ken

Love it or hate it, one thing you can say about many producers in Hollywood is that they are remarkably resilient. They don’t give up, and in some cases keep pitching ideas for years. There’s something to be said for that, because in my experience, when people outside Hollywood hit a wall, get rejected, or suffer a defeat, nine times out of ten, they give up.  But in Hollywood,

How To Get The Attention of Influencers

images_3

We’ve all had experiences where we desperately needed to meet someone important to pitch a project, share an idea, or just get to know them. Most of us don’t rub elbows everyday with leaders at the top of their game, so when the opportunity comes, we need to act. But the truth is, when that door opens, most of us blow it. We stumble, pull back, become afraid, or otherwise don’t take advantage of the opportunity that could change our future. To make sure you seize the moment next time you meet an influencer, here’s some key points to remember:

What We Could Learn From Film Director Christopher Nolan

220px-Christopher_Nolan,_London,_2013_(crop)

Movie director Christopher Nolan is quickly becoming a legend in Hollywood. Although he’s directed a number of memorable films, you may know him best as the 44 year old director of a trio of “Batman” movies, which together grossed $2.5 billion at the global box office. As he releases his latest film, “Interstellar,” he’s as respected as anyone in Hollywood and studios pay him as much as they do top stars. For instance,

In Media Programming, Are Male or Female Narrators More Effective?

images_66

I get a lot of questions about using male versus female voices in media productions. Largely because there are some terrific female narrators out there, and yet most videos, commercials, news, and other media seem to be dominated by male voices. Does it matter? I’ve asked many direct response producers, because DR is a genre that needs results right away. That includes infomercials, fundraising programming, donor development media, and most of religious media. It’s a place where you can measure results quickly, and Direct Response writers and producers have always told me

Are You Paying Attention To Unexpected Events?

bsrOzgDkQhGRKOVC7Era_9X6A3584

You could probably define my life as being filled with unexpected events.   So much so that I believe many of the best things I’ve experienced in life, I  discovered on the road to something I thought was better.  In this age of hyper-productivity, we set goals and then lock our eyes on the end result until it’s achieved.  But in the process, we often miss serendipitous things that occur along the journey.   For instance:

How People Watch TV in a Multiscreen Era

iStock_000005313703Medium

Recently, Variety Magazine highlighted a study by Strategy Analytics that attempted to understand how people view television in the multiscreen era. I’ve written before that television is alive and well, and shouldn’t be written off in the age of the Internet. But there’s no question, the way people view programming is changing. Overall, when it comes to viewing habits these days, here’s the breakdown:

Seth Godin’s Advice on Nit-Pickers: Pastors and Leaders Need to Read This

SethGodin

My friend Seth Godin wasn’t writing this for pastors, but when I read it, I realized pastors were exactly the right audience for this piece. Read it through and let me know if you agree. And perhaps more important – if you’ve ever experienced one or more of these types of folks in your church or ministry:

Shocking Research: Would You Prefer to Sit Alone With Your Thoughts, Or Receive an Electric Shock?

Man wearing tie holding jumper cables

I’ve spent years studying the impact of today’s distracted culture, but I wasn’t quite ready for the results of a new study by Science Magazine. Last month the magazine revealed just how difficult and unpleasant people think it is to sit alone with nothing to do but think. The magazine states: “In the study, participants were asked to rate the pleasantness of a number of stimuli, including an electric shock, and asked how much they’d pay (up to $5) to experience (or not) each stimulus. They were then asked to