What Happens When Contracts Replace Personal Morality


Since in today’s secular culture, the concept of “morality” is outdated, it’s interesting to see the incredible effort that’s being put into finding a substitute. Enter the Affirmative Consent Project. In an effort to defeat the supposed “rape culture” on U.S. college campuses, this organization is suggesting couples in love should have a contract. Among other things, they suggest the couple take a selfie to document their decision to hook up – just in case you get into court later. After all, if personal morality doesn’t exist, how else do we protect women?

Planned Parenthood’s Publicity – er, Pastoral Staff

Abortion 2

Many people were shocked when I shared the discovery of why Planned Parenthood’s atrocities recently revealed in undercover interviews have gotten little (if any) notice in the media. Most didn’t realize just how sophisticated their strategy is for silencing their critics and generating positive PR. But now, World Magazine reports that there’s more. James Bruce writes in World that

Should I Put a Statement About Same Sex Marriage on Our Church Website?

Dollarphotoclub_37422169 -2

Since the recent Supreme Court ruling, and the follow up pressure on companies, nonprofits, and churches, I’ve had a number of pastors ask me if they should put an official statement about the church’s view of marriage on their website. The thinking is that putting out a public statement will let people know upfront their position and save any confusion later. My friend Jack Graham, pastor of Prestonwood Church in Dallas, supports that view, and we’ve actually discussed the wording of their statement. When we initially discussed it, my first inclination was “no.” After all, why highlight an issue before it’s an issue? Especially when it just involves roughly 4% of the population. But Jack got me thinking (as usual), so I asked a range of respected leaders their opinion. I’ve listed a handful below, starting with “No, don’t do it” to “Yes, do it.” Let me know what you think:

How To Answer Tough – Even Angry – Questions About Your Faith


More and more people like the “New Atheists” are not only dismissive of religious faith, but they’re angry about it, to the point of declaring that belief in a Supreme being must be a sign of mental illness. In that increasingly hostile atmosphere, it’s becoming more and more challenging to respond when asked about our faith. David French, writing in the National Review, said recently:

What President Bill Clinton Thought About Religious Freedom


With all the uproar from the Hobby Lobby decision to the religious freedom legislation in Indiana, it seems the Left has become very clear that they want restrictions on religious freedom.  That’s why it may be instructive to read President Bill Clinton’s remarks at the signing of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act on the White House South Lawn on Nov. 16, 1993:

Hollywood Quote: “Lost” Producer Carlton Cuse on Pastor Rob Bell


“Did I tell you about the spiritual special I’ve been working on with Rob Bell?” The producer of the hit TV series “Lost” recently asked “Variety” magazine. Carlton Cuse said he thought Bell was “Smart, funny and insightful, and approached religion and spirituality from a very different perspective.” He’s been trying to help Bell find a place on the TV landscape after shooting several programs for the OWN Network. “If you claim to be

The Sweet Spot of Sharing the Christian Message


We’re seeing a lot of criticism recently of pastors, writers, speakers, filmmakers as well as others about how they share the Christian message with the outside culture. Some are criticized for making it too easy – they lead with the “grace” message, and are hesitant to talk about tough issues like sin, hell, or punishment. On the other side, those who preach a more serious message about tough subjects are labelled as “out of date,” “insensitive” and “hard core.” I know the debate well because over the years, I’ve had friends and clients on both sides of the argument. But here’s the problem: It’s the wrong argument, and here’s why: