The Perils and Prize of Leadership: An Interview with Dr. Sam Chand

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One of the most respected voices on church and ministry leadership today is Dr. Sam Chand.  On his website his tag line is “My Life’s Vision is Helping Others Succeed” - and he’s good at it.  Sam and I have shared a number of clients over the years and time and time again, I’ve seen him turn around struggling churches, inspire frustrated leaders, and transform the culture at failing organizations.  Recently, I did an interview with Dr. Chand because I wanted to share some of his experience,  wisdom, and insight on church and ministry leadership.  Take notes.  Share it.  This is powerful stuff:

Why Leadership By Threat Isn’t Leadership

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The New Testament book of Mark is a powerful example of who responded to the message of Jesus and who didn’t. Chapter 12 is an especially good example. The people (Mark describes them as “throngs”) loved his message, but those who resisted where those in authority, because they saw his message as a threat. Sadly, too many leaders today attempt to use threats as

The Problem With Chronically Late Leaders

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From time to time everyone is late. We live in a world of distractions, and everything from traffic, last minute phone calls, to all kinds of emergencies make us late from time to time. The key phrase here is “from time to time.” But what happens when leaders (particularly pastors) are chronically late? Let me tell you something I hear from office, team, and church staff members all the time:

A Real Life Example of Why Culture is More Important Than Vision

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Culture is more important than vision.  From experts like John Maxwell to Sam Chand, that premise is a critical leadership principle. The reason is simple: An organization’s culture sets the tone for everything else, and leaders are responsible for creating an organization’s culture. I don’t care how great or noble your vision – if you don’t have a capable and vibrant culture, then very little will happen. A strong culture inspires people, and

Target CEO Resigns: Leaders Are Responsible Even When Things Aren’t Their Fault

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The CEO of Target resigned last week amid the furor over the data breach that jeopardized 40 million payment card accounts since the Black Friday shopping weekend. Gregg Steinhafel had been at Target for 35 years and has been a respected leader through some challenging times. But with the data breach issue dragging on, and impacting stock prices, he finally stepped aside.  The truth is

10 Important Tips For Leaders

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Writer Fay Vincent shared 10 Tips for New Executives in the Wall Street Journal recently. While they were designed for new CEO’s taking over high profile positions, when I looked at the list I realized that these were powerful insights that every leader needs to consider. I’d encourage you to read the entire article, but for a brief synopsis, here’s the 10 tips:

Making Leadership Transitions Work

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While writing my book “Unique:  Telling Your Story in the Age of Brands and Social Media,” I discovered that far too many businesses and nonprofits struggle with leadership transitions, especially moving from founders to what I call “second generation” leadership.  Whatever transition you’re in (or see coming up), this short video is worth watching.  The stakes are too high to fail:

 

New Leaders: Accountability Starts On Day One

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In the last few years there have been some decisive shifts in leadership at major companies and nonprofit organizations. I spent the afternoon a few months ago with one who took over for a retired CEO at a well-known nonprofit organization. This new leader has been in place for over three years, but the truth is, he’s failing – badly. When I asked him about it, he blamed it on the previous retired CEO. The former leader wasn’t terribly decisive, and created a culture where everyone thought they should have a vote on everything. Needless to say, the administrative structure collapsed pretty quickly, and mutiny became

Warning Signs That You’re Petty and Insecure

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Proverbs 18:2 says: “A fool takes no pleasure in understanding, but only in expressing his opinion.”  Maybe you know a few people like that. I work in the media business, so I deal with petty and insecure people all the time. What drives me crazy is how they suck the life out of their team. They’re so obsessed with being in charge (and getting credit) even to the point of being willing to drive the organization into the ground.  So if you’re wondering if that might be you – or someone you work with – here’s a handy chart to help you identify the petty and insecure people in your office:

Working with Consultants – The 10 Biggest Mistakes

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During this trip to Australia, I’ve been asked a lot about what Cooke Pictures does when it consults with major non-profit, church, and ministry clients. I realized that most people really don’t understand how outside consultants can make a difference in helping an organization get to the next level. But the truth is, in the secular arena, “outsourcing” is all the rage – especially in corporate America. The theory behind the practice is worth thinking about: If there is some aspect of your business that you don’t do well, then outsource it to someone who does. For instance, a corporation that builds computers, might not be so strong at strategic planning, or a company that manufactures sports equipment, probably doesn’t understand marketing and public relations. So they find consultants with experience and success in those areas to give them advice, training, and expertise. Could churches, ministries, and other religious and non-profit organizations benefit from the concept?