How To Get Noticed On The Job

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I heard an employee described recently as a person who “simply passes everything on.” They meant he was someone who never takes responsibility, never deals with the issue, and never fixes the problem. They simply pass it on to someone else. How many people do you know who do exactly that?  Today’s lesson:

Creativity: Learning To Forget How Things Work

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This is our granddaughter Kennady.  I spend a lot of time watching her, and obviously, since she’s only a year old, she hasn’t had much time to learn how things work. As a result, the first few times I gave her a book, she had no idea what “reading” was, so she walked on it, set it up like an A-frame house, or used it for a plate. It’s been that way with everything. Since she doesn’t yet know the way things are “supposed” to be used, she just makes it up, and has come up with some pretty remarkable uses for things like

The 10 Most Common Communication Problems

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You may not know that before he was President of Fox News and Chairman of Fox Television Stations Group, Roger Ailes ran a corporate communications firm. He advised presidents like Ronald Reagan, celebrities, and major corporate CEO’s. In his book “You Are The Message” he lists the 10 most common communication problems that apply to speakers, executives, and leaders of all kinds. Here’s the list, because it’s worth thinking about. Which of these do you have the most difficulty?

Is It Time To End Our Obsession with “Story”?

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Story schmory. Yes, stories are important. Yes, stories fill a need. Yes, stories are a critical way of sharing information. Yes, stories go back to the beginning of time. Yes, there’s a reason story based programs are the most popular on network television. But can we just take a break from our obsession with stories?  We have

What If You Never Achieve Success in Your Lifetime?

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If you happen to be creative or have discovered the great purpose for your life, you probably spend time wondering if your work will ever get noticed. It’s such a big issue, that I wrote my book “One Big Thing: Discovering What You Were Born to Do” to help people find their purpose and then make it known to the world. Now, a documentary film on the life of photographer Vivian Maier is an incredible story of a remarkably gifted woman who never achieved artistic success in her lifetime, but never gave up her work. As her website states:

The Power of Creative, Thoughtful Design

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Steve Jobs said it very well: “Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.” If you’ve ever doubted the ability of great design to change things, then watch this interview with Nike designer Tobie Hatfield about how a new shoe idea solved a problem. After viewing, you’ll realize that creative design may not change the world, but it can change someone’s world:

Is It Time For You To Rise Above?

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Do you ever get tired of dealing with idiots, jerks, egomaniacs, budgets, lack of vision, rules, deadlines, guidelines, and timelines? You could always just deal with it. In fact, you could wallow in it, and many people do. After all, it gives you some great reasons for complaining, and if you’re a complainer, then go for it. But if you’re different, innovative, and original, then you simply have to rise above it. There are plenty of websites, books, and simplistic quotes that tell you

Should Churches Produce TV Programs?

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It’s pretty popular these days to bash local churches producing broadcast TV programs. Even megachurches with adequate budgets for media don’t escape the criticism. After all, the history of Christian television shows us that a significant number of programs through the years were downright embarrassing, and if anything, drove people away from the faith, rather than toward it. But in spite of the mistakes, poor quality, and questionable results of some church efforts, here’s 5 reasons I still encourage churches to consider a broadcast ministry:

How Taylor Swift Beat Apple

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To launch it’s new Apple Music streaming service, Apple recently offered a three-month trial to the public. Great idea. But Apple (who incidentially is worth about $729 billion) planned to not pay the artists for their music during the trial period, which means that Apple would essentially be having the artists themselves underwrite the promotion.  As many of you already know, Taylor Swift was the most vocal artist objecting to the idea, and her criticism was the strongest reason Apple finally backed down. How she did it is a great lesson in protesting anything you consider an injustice. Here’s what we can learn: