Find Your Tribe

As I was reading Seth Godin’s new book “Tribes” the other day, (highly recommended), I couldn’t help but think of Mark Horvath.  Mark has been a media director, marketing guy, and ministry media producer.  He’s worked with some of the largest media ministries in the country.  But he never found his niche, and many of the relationships never worked out.   He struggled for years, and then he found his thing –
homelessness.  During a difficult time years ago, Mark experienced homelessness first hand when he found himself on the street.  Through a miraculous intersection with The Dream Center in LA he got back on his feet, and eventually back into the marketing and media business.  But last year he started contributing to the homeless blog at change.org, and absolutely came alive.  I love those moments when the light goes on and someone discovers their destiny.  Mark has done exactly that.  His insightful reporting, compelling stories, and simply great content has allowed the homeless community in Los Angeles to have a real voice online.  And check out his video blog at Invisible People.

Today, Mark has a tribe of people who follow him as he tells the homeless story in Los Angeles.  He’s the perfect expression of the point of Seth’s book.  The world is looking for people who have a message and know how to express it.

Discover your voice.   Tell your story.  Find your tribe.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Ed Kallery

    I think Mark is in his element now. "The Element", a new book by Ken Robinson describes it as being in that place where your natural talent, your gift, meets your personal passion. That place where someone can be most themselves, yet most inspired and achieve at their highest level. Mark truely is a hero in my mind. One who overcame addictions, poverty, homelessness, not to just move on to a better life but to gain a foothold and then reach back, hands held out to pull as many of his peeps he can up out of the same struggles he was buried in. Keep pushin’ on, my brother.

  • I think that Mark has found more than a voice-he has found his passion. And this I find is an important component to truly give something your "all". This is where his heart is and I believe it will help make huge strides in the progression of home and shelter provision. Thanks for posting.

  • Mark’s story is one of a truly amazing journey.  I’ve watched Mark’s struggles and pain over the last few years and while his path has been excruciating, it’s interesting to see how his experiences have prepared him to do exactly what he is doing now.  Almost makes one believe there is a plan and a destiny for our lives. 

     

    I agree with Ed, Mark really is a hero.